Obama Era Executive Order to Raise Minimum Wage for Federal Contractors

Obama Era Executive Order to Raise Minimum Wage for Federal Contractors

The US Department of Labor’s Wage and Hour Division published a notice to announce that minimum wage for federal contractors will increase to $10.80 per hour from $10.60. A change that has become a regular occurrence thanks to the Obama Administration.

 

This regular minimum wage increase is the result of the Obama Administration’s Department of Labor’s final rule which implements Executive Order 13658. The order determined that a minimum wage would be set for contractors to pay their workers for work completed for federal contracts. This minimum wage started at $10.10, but has had consistent annual increases.

Explaining the Minimum Wage Increase

Explaining the Minimum Wage Increase

The executive order states:

 

This order seeks to increase efficiency and cost savings in the work performed by parties who contract with the Federal Government by increasing to $10.10 the hourly minimum wage paid by those contractors. Raising the pay of low-wage workers increases their morale and the productivity and quality of their work, lowers turnover and its accompanying costs, and reduces supervisory costs. These savings and quality improvements will lead to improved economy and efficiency in Government procurement.

 

As stated in the executive order, the original minimum wage standard was $10.10, and now (over the course of 5 years), it has grown to $10.80. Assuming that the executive order is not undone, there will be more minimum wage increases in the future. Is this what’s best for the construction industry though? Some people don’t think so. 

Opposition to the Executive Order

Opposition to the Executive Order

Associated Builders and Contractors, Inc. submitted a letter to the administration with concerns over the executive order. They claimed that it would cause confusion amongst government contractors, and lead to additional burdens thanks to unnecessary regulation. 

 

The regulation itself was seen as unnecessary due to the majority of government contractors already surpassing the $10.10 threshold in paying their workers. There were also concerns about setting a precedent where a government can come into an industry and tell them what to pay workers. Years later, the opposition to the executive order still exists, however, the order has not been rescinded.

Explaining the Execution of the Minimum Wage Increase

Explaining the Execution of the Minimum Wage Increase

The final rule/fact sheet attempts to address the concerns of contractors by breaking down the obligations that contracting agencies, contractors, and even the Department of Justice have. Not only does this attempt to address those concerns, but it also explains how the order is to be enforced. The final rule explains that the process itself “should be familiar to most government contractors and will protect the right of workers to receive the new $10.10 minimum wage. The Department of Labor generally has adopted existing mechanisms for enforcing long-established prevailing wage laws to enforce the provisions of the Executive Order”. It even confirms that around 200,000 workers will benefit from the order.

 

The obligations for contracting agencies, contractors, and the Department of Labor are broken down as follows:

 

Contracting agencies are responsible for ensuring that the contract clause implementing the Executive Order minimum wage requirement is included in any new contracts or solicitations for contracts covered by the Executive Order. Contracting agencies are also responsible for withholding funds when a contractor or subcontractor fails to abide by the terms of the applicable contract clause, such as by failing to pay the required Executive Order minimum wage, and for forwarding any complaints alleging a contractor’s non-compliance with Executive Order 13658 to the Wage and Hour Division.

 

Contractors and subcontractors must include the Executive Order contract clause in any covered lower-tiered subcontracts. They also must notify all workers performing on or in connection with a covered contract of the applicable minimum wage rate under the Executive Order. Contractors and subcontractors must pay covered workers the Executive Order minimum wage for all hours worked on or in connection with covered contracts, and must comply with pay frequency and recordkeeping obligations. Finally, the final rule prohibits the taking of kickbacks from wages paid to workers on covered contracts as well as retaliation against any worker for exercising his or her rights under the Executive Order or the implementing regulations.

 

The Secretary of Labor is required to determine the Executive Order minimum wage rate yearly beginning January 1, 2016, and publish this wage rate at least 90 days before the wage is to take effect. The final rule outlines the methods that the Department will utilize to notify the public of the Executive Order minimum wage,

 

Finally, the order explains how complaints against it can be taken up. It outlines a process for filing these complaints with the Wage and Hour Division. It also allows for investigations into instances of believed violations or abuses of the executive order, as well as resolutions/consequences for these violations. Lastly, the order provides an administrative process for resolving legal disputes over the order’s enforcement.

Going Forward

Despite opposition by contractors and contracting organizations, the executive order was submitted and enforced. This bill focuses on workers, and paying them a wage that the government believes to be fair. The final rule also states that it accomplishes this in a way that has long-been accepted, and in a way that multiple industries are familiar with. This should not only limit confusion, but prevent legal challenge due to the precedent of such laws being deemed as constitutional and acceptable.

 

There may still be opposition from contractors, however, the order is still in effect, and for now it looks like it will stay in effect moving forward.

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